As I approached Yehliu Geopark, it was raining hard, but I was convinced that I had reached the Bryce Canyon National Park-by-the-sea of Taiwan. I visited Bryce about 12 years ago to find hundreds of hoodoos all over the desert. A hoodoo is a pillar of stone, rising from the earth, that was formed as sediments deposited, became rock, and then eroded. That’s how many rocks form, but at Bryce, there were hoodoos because the tops (caps) of the pillars of stone were less prone to erosion than the sedimentary rock below. Therefore, the rock directly beneath the cap did not erode completely because it was protected by the cap, and because not all of the rocks had such strong caps, pillars formed over many many years.

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The famous hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park.

At Yehliu, there was a very similar geological phenomenon. This lead to “mushroom” rocks, which, like the hoodoos, look like solid mushrooms. There were many formations of mushroom rocks that looked like recognizable objects, or, in the Queen’s Head’s case, like people. Queen’s Head was named after Queen Elizabeth I of England. In the early 1960’s, part of this rock broke off leaving what looked like the side profile of Queen Elizabeth’s head.

Queen's Head rock from the side.
Queen’s Head rock from the side.
Portrait of Queen Elizabeth by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger or his studio, ca. 1595. Notice the similarities!
Portrait of Queen Elizabeth by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger or his studio, ca. 1595.
Notice the similarities! /wikimedia

I’m not sure what she would think of this name, but few people can claim to have a significant geological feature named after them!